The Vermont Economy

VPR's Steve Zind

VPR senior reporter Steve Zind focuses on the Vermont economy and its impact on our lives. Follow Steve Zind on Twitter, post comments on the stories, and let Steve know what local economy stories you think VPR should cover.

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It’s well accepted that a picture is worth a thousand words, as any visual learner or marketer will attest. But, how does one visualize something as enormous as the U.S. economy - the largest in the world at $19 trillion – and how do we view Vermont’s economy in comparison?

Shirts with Vermont Law School on them hang in Barrister's Book Shop in downtown South Royalton.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

In South Royalton, there’s a great craft beer bar, a bustling food co-op and a new coffee shop opening — but just about anyone you ask will tell you the town’s economic future depends on a healthy Vermont Law School.

Lucas Campbell operates one of the few landing crafts on Lake Champlain. Here, he readies the boat to take off from Burton Island State Park.
Henry Epp / VPR

Lake Champlain has a long history as a commercial waterway. In the 1800s, it was a crowded passage for boats hauling lumber and other goods between New York City and Montreal and points in between.

Much of that industry is long gone, but there's still some work on the lake for those who want it.

Unions representing Consolidated Communications workers say they’ve reached tentative three-year contract agreements with the company that will avert a strike.

The exterior of Memorial auditorium with a sign in front.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

The city of Burlington wants people who live and work there to weigh in on redevelopment plans for Memorial Auditorium.

Outside a barn in Lowell are a bunch of motorcycles as part of Road Pitch.
Hilary Niles / Niles Media

"There’s not enough funding in Vermont to help businesses get off the ground and grow" is a common refrain among startup and expanding businesses seeking investment capital to fuel their growth. But one unique Vermont event aims to teach entrepreneurs that, before they ask for money, they may want to first ask for advice.

More Americans will be writing a check to the IRS in April because their employers are not withholding enough from their paychecks following the new tax law, the Government Accountability Office says in a new report.

The Berlin Mall is working on a revitalization project to better serve the community.
Kyle Martel / KSE Partners, LLP

The age of malls seems to have passed. But what do you do to enliven or rejuvenate malls that are still in place? They represent an incredible investment in real estate, usually in a prime location with excellent access. Berlin has one of Vermont's few malls and it is undertaking a plan called the HUB Project to make the mall relevant again and serve the community. 

Walter Carpenter has served as a park attendant at the Waterbury Reservoir since 2008. During that time, he's developed new strategies for managing the 40,000 or so people who visit the day-use state park every summer.
Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

For the 40,000 or so visitors that go to the Waterbury Reservoir every summer, the 850-acre body of water has become a go-to oasis on hot summer days. But managing all that traffic, it turns out, is no simple task.

Norwich University in Northfield, Vermont is trying out a program where some students will receive reduced tuition in exchange for a percentage of their income for a set time after they graduate.
Patti Daniels / VPR File

If you’re going to college this fall, instead of taking out a student loan to help pay tuition, how about getting some money up front from your school? But there's a catch: Your school will take a percentage of your income for a set amount of time after you graduate.

Unionized Consolidated Communications workers in northern New England have authorized their leaders to call a strike if ongoing contract negotiations with the company don’t succeed.

Hillary Bliss and her daughters Peyton, 8, and Ella, 10, of Morrisville, pick buckets full of berries at Pleasant Valley Blueberries, in Elmore.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This week’s rain is a welcome development for many of Vermont’s pick-your-own berry businesses.

An image of the Vermont state flag.
btgbtg / iStock.com

A new VPR-Vermont PBS Poll out Monday takes the pulse of Vermonters ahead of the upcoming 2018 elections. We're digging into the poll results and looking at what issues Vermonters say are most important.

Nurses from the Brattleboro Retreat stand outside the hospital to bring attention to recent changes made to their schedules.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Nurses at the Brattleboro Retreat have been holding informational pickets in front of the southern Vermont psychiatric hospital to bring attention to what they say are radical schedule changes enacted by the administration that violate their union contract.

State Auditor Doug Hoffer, seen here in his Montpelier office seated at a desk.
Henry Epp / VPR File

A new report from the Office of the Vermont State Auditor says it's nearly impossible to quantify the impact of Vermont's business incentive programs.

UVM nurses holding signs outside the UVM Medical Center.
Ari Snider / VPR

Union nurses at the University of Vermont Medical Center went on strike for two days last week after their contract expired and no new agreement could be reached. Now that the strike is over, both sides are coming back to the bargaining table, but difficult issues remain.

Vermont Law School sign on a fall day in October 2012.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press FIle

There is turmoil at Vermont Law School following the news that tenure has been revoked for 14 out of 19 faculty members at the South Royalton institution. A recent VTDigger article revealed the 75 percent reduction in tenured faculty as part of a plan to help restructure finances that have taken a hit from ongoing budget deficits.

It’s no surprise that the lead story in this week’s Vermont Standard will be about the fire in downtown Woodstock Monday.

What may be surprising is that the local paper is publishing an issue at all. That’s because the building that burned contained the Standard’s offices.  

In 1793, the ruler of the Earth’s richest and most powerful nation met with a delegation from what was then part of the developing world seeking to establish trade relations.

Revitalizing Waterbury Executive Director Karen Nevin says the annual Waterbury Arts Festival is her organization's primary fundraiser.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

This weekend's annual Waterbury Arts Festival is a big deal in town, it's a family-friendly event as well as a major fundraiser for the community development organization Revitalizing Waterbury.

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