The Vermont Economy

VPR's Steve Zind

VPR senior reporter Steve Zind focuses on the Vermont economy and its impact on our lives. Follow Steve Zind on Twitter, post comments on the stories, and let Steve know what local economy stories you think VPR should cover.

The newspaper that serves the Upper Valley of Vermont and New Hampshire is cutting jobs, moving its print operation and shrinking the width of its paper.

The sign outside of the University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington.
Taylor Dobbs / VPR File

Union nurses at the University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington have voted to authorize a two-day strike if necessary.

The union and the hospital have been in contract negotiations since March, and the nurses' contract expires July 9.

President Donald Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau standing outside at the 2018 G-7 summit.
Evan Vucci / Associated Press

Tuesday's headlines are all about President Donald Trump's historic summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, but it was just a few days ago that Trump lashed out at one of the United States' closest allies: Canada.

Thea Alvin holds a photo of her old barn, framed behind a gothic arch she built. The barn burned down in December, but the arch still stands. A community member stopped by and gave her the photo last week.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

It was a tough winter for Thea Alvin.

On Dec. 18, 2017, life changed overnight for her and her partner Michael Clookey.

Bottles of maple syrup are lined up on a table, their nutrion facts visible, while Rep. Peter Welch and Sen. Patrick Leahy stand in the background.
Lisa Rathke / Associated Press

Two issues of concern have cropped up recently for Vermont's maple sugar producers.

An aerial shot of a pop-up tiny house village
Liz Lavorgna, Core Photography / Courtesy

For the third year running, Brattleboro will be the site of a festival dedicated to tiny houses.

We're talking about the law that reimburses out-of-staters up to $10,000 to move to Vermont to work remotely, and how it fits into the state's strategy on jobs and attracting workers.
Infadel / iStock

By now you've probably heard about the law that reimburses out-of-staters up to $10,000 to move to Vermont to work remotely. We're talking about that plan and the big reaction it's getting, both positive and negative. Plus, how remote work fits into Vermont's economy and what else the state is doing to support it as an option.

Skiers on a sunny day at Okemo Mountain Resort.
Okemo Mountain Resort, courtesy

Vail Resorts is acquiring two more East Coast ski mountains: Okemo Mountain Resort in Vermont and Mount Sunapee Resort in New Hampshire.

Maple syrup in glass leaf-shaped bottles.
Toby Talbot / Associated Press File

The Vermont Attorney General is urging citizens to speak out against a new federal rule requiring maple syrup bottles to be labeled "added sugar." 

A groundbreaking ceremony was held at One Taylor Street, in Montpelier on Tuesday, May 29.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Construction will soon be underway on a multimodal transit and welcome center in Montpelier. It’s known as the One Taylor Street project — and it’s been a long time coming.

Keurig Green Mountain is laying off 35 workers, including some at the company's Waterbury facility, seen here.
Henry Epp / VPR

Keurig Green Mountain is laying off 35 people in Vermont, effective Friday, June 1, according to the state’s Department of Labor.

Hands using a calculator.
MangoStar_Studio / iStock

A coalition of 40 nonprofit groups says a proposed cap on tax credits for charitable contributions will have a devastating impact on their ability to offer services to Vermonters.

The number of adults  living with their parents is increasing. We're talking about these living situations and how they can work.
Kwanchai Khammuean / iStock

You might have seen a story making the rounds about a 30-year-old forced by a court to leave his parents' house. It's an oddball example of what is an increasingly common arrangement: adult children living with their parents.

We're talking about reasons people might choose this situation, and how they make it work (or alternatively, ways it can go wrong).

A streetview of downtown Wilmington, Vermont.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

An economic development organization in Wilmington is offering $20,000 to the entrepreneur who comes up with the best business plan and is able to open up a new store in the downtown area.

Granite, seen here at the Rock of Ages quarry in Barre, is one of Vermont's three state rocks, along with marble and slate.
Jane Lindholm / VPR

Vermont has three state rocks — and with good reason. Granite, marble and slate have done a lot to shape the state economically, environmentally and demographically. On this Vermont Edition, we dig into how and why that happened.

A simultaneous training session for 175,000 employees, across more than 8,000 stores — that's what Starbucks is doing Tuesday, urging its workers and managers to discuss racial bias and respect following the arrest of two black men at a Philadelphia store last month.

For the sessions, many Starbucks stores will shut down in the afternoon and stay closed for several hours. A sign at one location in Chicago, for instance, says the store will be locking its doors at 2:30 p.m. and reopening on Wednesday. Other stores have posted similar notices.

A sign in Nanci Leitch's home in Guilford that she rents out with Airbnb.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

A bill that would have placed new requirements on people who rent out their homes on websites like Airbnb will not likely survive this legislative session.

SunCommon warehouse filled with solar panels.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR File

A Vermont solar company is expanding into New York's Hudson Valley.

Don, from Greenfield, Mass. sands a countertop at The Wilson House in East Dorset.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

During the first weekend in June the Wilson House in East Dorset will hold a 30th anniversary celebration to recognize the renovations to the birthplace and childhood home of Bill Wilson, one of the co-founders of Alcoholics Anonymous.

A homeless encampment on Sears Lane in Burlington was taken down by the city last October.
Liam Connors / VPR

After last year's big debate over homelessness and violence in Vermont's largest city, Burlington officials planned to change their approach on the issue, with more emphasis on supporting the homeless community.

Pages