VPR News

Patti Daniels / VPR

Vermont's Republican governor asked the Legislature to deliver a state law that blunt's some of federal law enforcement's ability to identify undocumented people for deportation. The state Senate unanimously agreed, and now the House will weigh in. So where do Republican legislators stand on the question?

Almost a century ago in Charlottesville, Virginia, Carrie Buck’s mother had been institutionalized for what was then called feeblemindedness.

Despite good grades Carrie was pulled from school by her foster parents at the end of sixth grade for domestic work. Soon Carrie became pregnant, and her foster family, knowing she’d probably been assaulted by a visiting relative, also had her institutionalized for being feebleminded.

Carrie’s circumstances made her the unfortunate legal target of the American eugenics movement.

Five years ago, when St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire built a new science and math building, a decision was made to suspend a nearly six-foot diameter, white latex-painted globe called Science-on-a-Sphere from the ceiling of the third-floor conference room.

As immigration officials ramp up deportation of new classes of unauthorized immigrants, more residents and visitors without documents fear run-ins with police.

On New Hampshire's diverse Southern border, a traffic stop in one town could lead to very different consequences than the same kind of stop one town over.

Alex Brandon / AP

Sen. Bernie Sanders is now a national figure. But has his role changed in the Senate?

Muslims in America are the subject of heated political debate. But they account for a very small number of elected politicians in New England.

One nonprofit, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is encouraging American-Muslims across the U.S. to run for political office. The group, called Jetpac, will train potential candidates regardless of party affiliation with the goal of increasing civic engagement within Muslim communities.

IBM and the Vermont Electric Power Company have teamed up to form a new technology company to help manage the electricity grid.

Many small towns in New England are eager to welcome refugees from the war in Syria, but that doesn’t seem likely under President Donald Trump’s shifting immigration policy.

St. Johnsbury Academy in Vermont has found a way around that -- they’re offering scholarships to refugees already living in the U.S.

Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

For towns such as Elmore, in Lamoille County, school choice is a 140-year tradition. When the town was considering a merger with neighboring Morristown last year, some residents were concerned they'd be giving up that tradition for a tax break. A year later, the town is experiencing the pros and cons of that choice.

Angela Evancie / VPR

Speaker of the House Mitzi Johnson joins the program to talk about a range of topics, including the Legislature's reaction to Gov. Phil Scott's proposal for Vermont school budgets.

In the 1960s and 1970s, Dartmouth College buried lab animals, human tissues and other medical waste at Rennie Farm. Today some drinking water in the areas around Rennie Farm has been contaminated with 1,4 dioxane, a suspected carcinogen.

Immigration has always played a vital role in Vermont’s history. First, a sparse but long-established Native American population was joined by the English – the first European settlers in what became Vermont. Then came Italians, Spaniards, and French Canadians, followed by more recent waves of refugees – Vietnamese, Laotians, Cambodians, Bosnians and Somalis, among others.

Macaulay Lerman / Vermont Folklife Center

Ryan Yoder of the Yoder Farm in Danby says there is a need for diversification in agriculture, to develop outside markets and improve infrastructure.

New deportation rules issued by President Donald Trump's administration aim to significantly increase deportations, as well as enlist local police officers as enforcers. The Mexican general consulate of New England is now working to educate Mexican nationals about their rights. 

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Peter Hirschfeld / VPR

A push by the State Board of Education to expand the special-education obligations of independent schools across Vermont has earned it some new enemies in Montpelier, and proposed legislation that would strip the 11-person panel of its century-old role in setting education policy.

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