VPR News

Sen. Dick Sears, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, backs bill to expand domestic terrorism law to deal with cases like the alleged incident at Fair Haven Union High School
Angela Evancie / VPR

The Vermont Senate has given unanimous approval to legislation that updates the state's domestic terrorism laws as a way to help thwart future mass shootings.

This spring, the Vermont General Assembly passed a resolution commemorating the 100th anniversary of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s birth.

Three speed limit signs, one that says 25 mph, one that says 30 mph along with a No Parking This Side of Street sign, and one that is 35 mph
Emily Corwin, Meg Malone / VPR

In 1999, the chairman of the select board for the town of Mount Tabor requested the speed limit on Route 7 in town be reduced from 50 mph to 45 mph. An Agency of Transportation engineering study seemed to support a speed as high as 60 mph, but the agency recommended the limit remain at 50 mph.

A stretch of road in Plymouth, Vermont, with a 35 miles per hour speed limit sign on the right and a car approaching in the distance.
Emily Corwin / VPR

Plymouth, Vermont, issued more than $415,620 in traffic ticket fines in 2017 — more than any other town in Vermont. Most tickets were issued in a 35-mile-per-hour zone on Route 100.  The state has not reviewed the speed limit there in 45 years.

The exterior of the Stamford school with blue sky and mountains in the background.
Micah Hayre, Courtesy

A plan to create the first interstate school district between Vermont and Massachusetts got a step closer after the town of Clarksburg, Massachusetts, voted to spend $25,000 on a feasibility study.

Kids, parents and schools all are still figuring out how to deal with the increased connectivity offered by smartphones and social media.
milicad / iStock

Live call-in discussion: Kids are growing up amidst the constant connectivity offered by smartphones and social media. We're talking about how parents, schools and young people themselves think about the technology in their lives and how they use it so that the benefits outweigh the risks.

Welcome to Bridgewater sign next to a 25 mph speed limit sign
Emily Corwin / VPR

In 2017, deputies issued more tickets in Bridgewater than anywhere else in the state. The vast majority of these tickets were issued in a 25 mph "school zone" — even though the Bridgewater Village School closed three years ago.

Exterior of Community Health Centers of Burlington building.
Liam Elder-Connors / VPR

Community Health Centers of Burlington announced it has reached a landmark in the number of patients served by its program that uses medication to treat opiate addiction.

One’s twenties are usually spent experimenting - with jobs, relationships and living situations - often in urban settings. But I’ve found four young people who find plenty of room for exploration right here in Vermont.

An illustration of a car pulled over on a road by a police officer and the cop is talking to the driver. There is a blue sky, green mountains and a grey house in the background.
Illustration: Aaron Shrewsbury / For VPR

If you got a traffic ticket in Vermont last year, you’re not alone.

Law enforcement issued more than 24,000 tickets worth upwards of $4 million in fines to drivers in Vermont in 2017. A quarter were issued in just three Vermont towns: Plymouth, Bridgewater and Mount Tabor. 

As more states legalize marijuana, there's growing interest in a cannabis extract — cannabidiol, also known as CBD.

It's marketed as a compound that can help relieve anxiety — and, perhaps, help ease aches and pains, too.

Part of the appeal, at least for people who don't want to get high, is that CBD doesn't have the same mind-altering effects as marijuana, since it does not contain THC, the psychoactive component of the plant.

In his 1939 essay, Education, the late E.B. White commended the teacher in a two-room seacoast Maine schoolhouse where his son spent happy days.

What details would you include in your obituary? A Brattleboro-area hospice is using the question to encourage thinking about living and aging well.
Matthew Smith / VPR

What do you want your obituary to say? What details beyond birth, death and the basics are essential to the story of your life? The Brattleboro Area Hospice is holding a workshop encouraging people to think about their life - and to to engage people about aging well, dying well and making plans now for how to spend one's final days.

We're talking about philosophy as a discipline and a way of thinking - and its relevance to everyday life.
Jakarin2521 / iStock

Live call-in discussion: Philosophy can get a bad rap as a subject only for scholars and academics, with little use in the real world. But many in the field say that philosophy doesn't have to be inaccessible; it can be a tool we use to tackle a wide range of the problems that we face every day. We're delving into this ancient subject and exploring how philosophy is relevant today.

Moats: Twitter Power

Apr 23, 2018

People sometimes ask, “Why can’t the media just ignore the crazy tweets coming out of the White House?”

Jack Sawyer sits in Rutland Superior Court
Glenn Russell / Burlington Free Press / Pool File

Rutland County State's Attorney Rose Kennedy has dismissed the four most serious charges against Jack Sawyer, saying a ruling by the Vermont Supreme Court has made prosecution “untenable.”

The Tram Haus Lodge at Jay Peak was one project invested in by foreign investors through the EB-5 program.
Angela Evancie / VPR File

A Vermont judge has dismissed a lawsuit against the state officials who oversaw allegedly fraudulent EB-5 projects in the Northeast Kingdom. 

 A gun rally drew more than a thousand people to Montpelier Saturday; some came in part to pick up a free high capacity magazine that will be banned under new legislation.
John Dillon / VPR File

A constitutional challenge of Vermont’s new ban on high-capacity magazines will hinge less on the Second Amendment than on Article 16 of the Vermont Constitution.

Scott Pruitt stands in front of an American flag and an EPA sign at a press conference in Washington, D.C. on April 3, 2018.
Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

All three members of Vermont's congressional delegation are calling on the head of the Environmental Protection Agency to resign, because they say that EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has failed to protect the nation's environment and they charge that Pruitt has engaged in unethical conduct while in office.

A bill proposing new regulations on toxic substances was vetoed by Gov. Phil Scott, but lawmakers are voting again and could override the veto.
Antoine2K / iStock

A bill that could change how Vermont regulates toxic substances was vetoed by Gov. Scott. Now lawmakers are working on a possible veto override. We're looking at what the bill could mean for Vermont, the reasons behind the governor's veto and the prospect of a possible override. 

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