VPR News

Part of the tax overhaul plan in the U.S. House could significantly impact graduate students, including those at the University of Vermont.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

As the U.S. Senate prepares to take up its version of a major tax overhaul in the coming weeks, one provision in the House plan is raising concerns among graduate students.

Every inch of the dinner table is covered with food. There are holiday basics like turkey, stuffing and mashed potatoes, and then there are family specialties like samosas.

Hawo Ahmed, 24, scans the options, pointing out a spicy sauce her sister made to eat with the pooris, a sort of savory pastry. Then she comes across an American dish and asks, “I don’t know about this, what is this?”

“This is cranberry sauce,” one of the family’s guests says with a laugh.

Every year, about 4,000 people in Vermont turn 65 - roughly the population of Randolph – contributing to a nearly one-to-one ratio between young and older Vermonters.

The current issue of "Vermont Life" magazine on a table.
Henry Epp / VPR

For decades, Vermont Life magazine has projected a bucolic image of the Green Mountain State. But it has struggled to hold on to subscribers in recent years and racked up over $3 million in debt.

Now nine bidders are in the running to take over the state's signature promotional magazine.

The Scott administration says its web-only process for gathering public input will make it easier for residents to weigh in on the state budget, but critics say it is a poor stand-in for public hearings.
Kirk Carapezza / VPR/file

A few years ago, Vermont enacted a law that tries to give the general public a bigger role in the budget writing process, but one legislator says the Scott administration isn’t following the spirit of the statute.

Emily Corwin / VPR News

As attitudes toward pain management change, some researchers say there's better evidence supporting cannabis use for chronic neuropathic pain management than opioids. Yet, for this Vermonter, an opioid prescription costs a dollar, while medical marijuana costs hundreds.

Glasses, a book and a mug sit on a wood table in front of a couch with pillows.
wernerimages / iStockphoto.com

Live call-in discussion: One of life's joys is losing yourself in the pages of a good read. As it gets colder outside, we're talking about books to cozy up with — and we want to hear what titles you suggest your fellow listeners check out.

One recent night I was late for a concert. But within minutes of my arrival in the hall, an unexpected harmony of words and melody startled me and brought tears to my eyes.

Former Fish & Wildlife board chairman Brian Ames, left, and photographer Candace Brown discuss who should be able to use the state boat launches while standing along the Connecticut River in Putney.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont's boaters and anglers pay for public boat launches through their license fees and specific use-taxes, and the general public is not allowed to park at the areas for other uses. But the chairman of the committee on Fish, Wildlife & Water Resources says the boat launch areas should be available to everyone.

As the nation once again celebrates Thanksgiving, the annual question of what it really mean to be thankful reappears. Miles Anton of Brattleboro shares his perspective on what the purpose of Thanksgiving.

On the eve of a holiday full of tradition, Kiran Waqar of South Burlington reflects on what it means to be thankful in her family and how they've crafted their own traditions.


The sign outside the Vermont Department of Public Safety headquarters.
Amy Kolb Noyes / VPR

Vermont's Public Safety Broadband Network Commission was tasked with determining the state's best option for building out a public safety broadband network. The commission is now recommending that Gov. Phil Scott opt in to a federal contract with AT&T.

The AG’s office settled a case this week against Dean Corren. Former Attorney General Bill Sorell filed a case in 2015 saying a email sent by the Vermont Democratic Party in support of Corren’s 2014 lieutenant governor campaign was an illegal contribution
Taylor Dobbs / VPR

The Vermont attorney general's office has reached a settlement in a case against a former candidate for lieutenant governor.

For the young and the agile, winter in Vermont means heading to the ski slopes or crisscrossing white fields, donning snowshoes or silver skates. But for many older Vermonters or anyone with mobility problems, winter can be more of a challenge than a game. Homes are shuttered, life moves indoors and social connections go dormant.

Person with arms extended looking at a sunset.
Irudayam / Flickr Creative Commons

On the day before Thanksgiving, what are are you grateful for? Wednesday on Vermont Edition, we're exploring who and what makes us feel gratitude, and how we can turn feelings of gratefulness into action.

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