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Independent gubernatorial candidate Trevor Barlow at the VPR studios.
Bayla Metzger / VPR

The general election is just weeks away. Leading up to the vote, we're featuring interviews with candidates seeking statewide offices. Trevor Barlow is running for governor as an independent.

Bennington Museum

Bennington Museum’s current exhibition of New Deal art is a fine collection of prints, photographs and paintings from the 1930s – including several paintings by my father, Ronald A. Slayton.

Charles Laramie
Charles Laramie, Courtesy

The midterm general elections are fast approaching, and VPR is featuring interviews with candidates running for statewide office. Charles Laramie is an independent running in the gubernatorial race.

The exterior of the Vermont Statehouse in Montpelier on a blue-sky day.
Angela Evancie / VPR file

With only about a month until Election Day, candidates for statewide office are garnering most of the media attention in Vermont. However political action committees appear to be focusing most of their energy on local races for House and Senate.

Gerry Broome / AP

I’ve often been moved by the story of animal victims in the midst of human tragedy.

A blue hospital monitoring line that turns into a dollar symbol.
hh5800 / iStock

Vermont's two major party candidates for governor — Republican incumbent Gov. Phil Scott and Democratic nominee Christine Hallquist — have sharp disagreements on the path Vermont should take to make health care more affordable in the short term. Yet the two candidates view the long-term solution in a similar way.

Retired lawyer James Dunn's book "Breach of Trust" looks at the scandal surrounding Chittenden County Assistant Judge Jane Wheel in the 1980s, tracing the growing controversy as it made its way up to the Vermont Supreme Court.
Onion River Press, courtesy

Lying under oath. Twisting court decisions for personal gain. Misuse of public money. And corruption in the judiciary that went all the way to Vermont’s highest court.

It may sound like the latest legal thriller, but it's the true story that rocked the state in the 1980s, ending with an investigation that saw the first-ever felony charges brought against a Vermont judge.

Sen. Patrick Leahy questioned Judge Brett Kavanaugh as the Senate Judiciary Committee considered his nomination.
Win McNamee / AP

Last week, Sen. Patrick Leahy played a central role in the testimony of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh. As the Senate continues to weigh Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court, we're talking to Sen. Leahy about the nomination, the FBI investigation and what comes next.

Cartoonist Jason Lutes, whose self portrait appears top left, spent more than 20 years writing and drawing the multi-volume historical epic "Berlin." The final volume was published in September.
Jason Lutes / Drawn & Quarterly

A grizzled journalist writing through his middle age. A young artist in her 20s fleeing an upper middle-class life traced out by her parents. The two meet on a train headed to Berlin in 1928, and their lives unfold, connect and diverge amid the backdrop of a changing Germany between the World Wars. They're among the characters in the graphic novel Berlin by cartoonist and Center for Cartoon Studies professor Jason Lutes.

Updated at 7:51 a.m. ET on Thursday

The FBI's highly anticipated supplemental background check on Brett Kavanaugh was sent to the White House and Capitol Hill overnight, with senators set to review the report on Thursday in the final chapter of what has become a deeply acrimonious confirmation battle.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., announced the planned arrival of the report on Wednesday night and said all senators would get a chance to review it ahead of the next procedural milestones in the chamber.

A meeting with Vermont Agency of Education staff facing State Board of Education members in Bethel.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

After an all-day meeting Tuesday in Bethel, the State Board of Education has adopted a set of guidelines to help steer its decisions about which school districts will be forced to merge under Act 46.

The 2018 general election is fast-approaching, and leading up to Election Day, we're featuring interviews with candidates seeking statewide offices. Jon Svitavsky is running as an independent for the U.S. Senate seat currently held by Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Updated on Wednesday at 4:15 p.m. ET

Wednesday afternoon, at exactly 2:18 p.m. ET, million of Americans received a text headlined "Presidential Alert" on their cellphones.

But it wasn't exactly from President Trump. Rather, it was a test of a new nationwide warning system that a president could use in case of an armed attack by another country, a cyberattack or a widespread natural disaster.

I can always count on Stephen Colbert to put my brain’s inner musings to words.

A Keurig Dr. Pepper sign in Waterbury, Vermont.
Henry Epp / VPR

Over the last 20 years, the state of Vermont has authorized more than $10 million in payments to Keurig Green Mountain, Inc.

The company, known for its K-Cup pods, is just one of many Vermont businesses that have used state incentive programs aimed at creating jobs. But exactly how much money Keurig received and what the company did with it is shrouded in secrecy.

The NBC studios sign at night in Manhattan, that also says Rainbow Room and Observation Deck.
canbedone / iStock

Saturday Night Live made some fun of Vermont last weekend, with a sketch featuring a group of Southern white nationalists who discuss where to find a “Caucasian paradise.” The skit contrasts Vermont’s liberal, bucolic image with some uncomfortable realities, and was welcomed by people inside and out of the state.

The Vermont Ethics Commission says Gov. Phil Scott has violated the state’s code of ethics by maintaining an ongoing financial relationship with a company that does business with the state.

Toby Talbot / AP

Until recently, I could neither pronounce nor spell the word prion, an altered cellular protein that triggers a suite of infectious diseases, mostly fatal, in the brain and central nervous system of mammals, including humans.

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