VPR News

This week as part of our Gunshots series, we asked Vermonters about the role of guns in their lives. Hannah Rommer grew up in Southern Vermont. Now, she's a music teacher and Orchestra conductor in Hanover, New Hampshire and reached out to us to share her story.

Public Safety Commissioner Thomas Anderson speaks at a highway safety press conference in Waterbury on Tuesday afternoon. Following recent fatalities on Vermont roads, Anderson says there will be a greater presence of state and local police on roadways.
Bob Kinzel / VPR

Over a 48-hour period beginning this past weekend, eight people died in traffic accidents in various parts of the state. Vermont has rarely witnessed this many highway deaths in such a short period of time.

Henry Epp / VPR

In Vermont, of all the deaths by gunshot wounds in the last six years, more than a quarter were suicides by current or former members of the armed forces. Even though Veterans Affairs knows that soldiers are at greater risk of taking their own lives, it’s difficult to intervene successfully.

Now, one Vermont mom who lost her son has made it her mission to end veteran suicide.

Gov. Phil Scott says he wants to be sure road safety concerns are dealt with before approving a legal recreational marijuana market in Vermont.
La_Corivo / iStock.com

Gov. Phil Scott says he’s about to convene a “blue ribbon commission” to study issues related to the legalization of marijuana.

Vermont Suicide Prevention Center Director Joelle Tarallo says feelings of connection are very important in preventing suicide.
PeopleImages / iStock

According to the Vermont Department of Mental Health, the suicide rate in Vermont has increased over the past 10 years. In 2014, according to the department’s data, there were more than 17 suicides per 100,000 Vermonters. The New York Times reported that the national average that year was 13 suicides per 100,000 people.

This week nearly half a million pieces of bait about the size of a quarter will be dropped from low-flying airplanes in more than 100 communities in the northern half of Vermont.

In this file photo, Judith Jones accepts a lifetime achievement award at the James Beard Foundation Awards ceremony on May 8, 2006 in New York. Jones, who edited cookbooks and more throughout her career, died at her summer home in Walden on Aug. 2, 2017.
Richard Drew / Associated Press File

When editor and author Judith Jones died last week at her summer home in Walden, Vermont, she was remembered as someone who forever changed our attitudes toward cooking and food. Jones was working for Alfred A. Knopf publishing when she discovered Julia Child, whose groundbreaking book on French cooking had been rejected by other publishers.

Up until now the outdoor recreation businesses in Vermont have not had a statewide advocacy group. Governor Phil Scott signed an executive order creating a collaborative to support the industry.
John Atkinson / Vermont Mountain Bike Association

Recreation businesses involving activities such as skiing, hiking, mountain biking and boating bring a lot of money into Vermont. But until now there hasn't been an organized effort to bring all of those businesses together and possibly provide some organized state support.

This week as part of our Gunshots series, we asked Vermonters about the role of guns in their lives. Last year, Commentator Deborah Lee Luskin became a licensed hunter and bought her first gun after decades of never wanting one.

Walt Cottrell  lives in Newbury and he delays haying on his property to try to protect bobolinks and other birds that nest in the high grass. Cottrell says the bobolinks disappeared from his property about ten years ago.
Howard Weiss-Tisman / VPR

Vermont farmers are taking part in a regionwide effort to put off haying, when possible, to give grassland birds a better chance of surviving.

A play by Massachusetts to inject more renewable power into its electricity mix could reshape the entire region's energy landscape. Dozens of developers are competing to offer Massachusetts the best price for long-term contracts to supply clean energy to hundreds of thousands of homes. 

But many of the projects also face another challenge: convincing residents of Northern New England it's in their interest to host the Bay State's extension cord.

This week as part of our Gunshots series, we asked Vermonters about the role of guns in their lives. Robin Earle, a 28-year-old graphic designer living in Milton, shared these thoughts.

In this 2013 photo, an employee of Brown & Brown Insurances uses a treadmill desk
Michael Conroy / AP

The sedentary hours we spend at work at a desk or in front of a computer take a toll on our health. With nearly two-thirds of Vermont adults overweight or obese, businesses are discovering the benefits of giving employees more opportunities to be active and eat better. 

Taylor Dobbs, Emily Alfin Johnson / VPR

From Jan. 1, 2011 to the end of December, 2016, 420 people died in Vermont from gunshot wounds. The majority of those people died by suicide. For the Gunshots project, VPR created a database of all 420 of those deaths in an effort to better understand the issue of gun deaths in Vermont.

VPR compiled a database of all of the gun deaths in the state of Vermont between the beginning of 2011 and the end of 2016. The database has information about every person who died by gunshot during that period: including age, veteran status, marital status, education level and other details that can help Vermonters better understand which parts of their community are most affected by gun deaths.

This week as part of our Gunshots series, we asked Vermonters about the role of guns in their lives. Greg Schoppe a web developer living in Burlington shared these thoughts.

For students starting medical school, the first year can involve a lot of time in a lecture hall. There are hundreds of terms to master and pages upon pages of notes to take.

But when the new class of medical students begins at the University of Vermont's Larner College of Medicine next week, a lot of that learning won't take place with a professor at a lectern.

The school has begun to phase out lectures in favor of what's known as "active learning" and plans to be done with lectures altogether by 2019.

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